The biggest threat to your caffeine addiction? Climate change

• November 11, 2012
Coffee cup

Creative Commons: Lali Masriera, 2006

Climate change could severely reduce the areas suitable for wild Arabica coffee before the end of the century.

That is the conclusion of work by a UK-Ethiopian team published in the academic journal Plos One. It supports predictions that a changing climate could damage global production of coffee – the world’s second most traded commodity after oil.

Wild Arabica is important for the sustainability of the coffee industry because of its genetic diversity. Arabica coffee and Robusta coffee are the two main species used commercially, although the former provides about 70% of production. The Arabica crops grown in the world’s coffee plantations are from very limited genetic stock and are thought to lack the flexibility to cope with climate change and other threats such as pests and diseases.

Read more: BBC News >>


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TckTckTck is the online hub for the Global Call for Climate Action. The GCCA represents an unprecedented alliance of more than 400 nonprofit organizations from around the world. Our shared mission is to mobilize civil society and galvanize public support to ensure a safe climate future for people and nature, to promote the low-carbon transition of our economies, and to accelerate the adaptation efforts in communities already affected by climate change.

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